Outpatient surgery walk thru

I need to understand the complete surgery for external surgery. I was under the impression that it was done in hospital and patient would be intubated and remain in hospital a couple of days to a week. I just noticed that a patient did it as outpatient. Are you intubated or not. I think intubation fear are as intense as surgery itself. Can anyone clarify the whole process as it happened to you. thanks.

I think this may vary from doc to doc where they chose to do their surgeries or have privledges but most external unless there are other factors making it high risk would be done outpatient. Only intubation is for anesthesia which would occur with any surgery.
I felt much better going to a stand alone surgery center rather than have surgery in a hospital setting. You are carefully screened and no one except the patient enters the building. I know I just scheduled a colonscopy at an outpatient facility and have to take COVID test 2 days before.

1 Like

I think you might see internal method that might include tonsils out or other procedures might be inpatient with a 1 night stay. depends on procedures and risk factors of patient.

Thanks for replying. So we’re you intubated? Seems like your surgery was breeze.

Intubation is required when general anesthesia is given. The anesthesia drugs paralyze the muscles of the body, including the diaphragm, which makes it impossible to take a breath without a ventilator. Most patients are extubated, meaning the breathing tube is removed, immediately after surgery .

Ive had 20 surgeries in my life. This one was a walk in the park. I was down to one painkiller a day on the 3rd day. That’s unusual for me. I do strongly believe that the combo of pillow, constant ice and predisone made this a comfortable experience for me. All I had was some jaw pain and some first bite stuff the first week or two but nothing compared to pain I had previously.

intubation for COVID due to breathing issues and other complications is a whole different animal that intubation for surgery. Their purposes are entirely different. Risks and long term side effects from intubation for COVID are usually a result of long term intubation and already compromised lung function. This also applies to premature babies who have to be intubated. There is higher risk of lifelong issues. Soem come out of it, with no side effects.

1 Like

You’re so helpful. I was intubated once and it was a horrible. I woke up with swollen tongue and no voice for eight months. Eating was difficult, gave me great anxiety, skin rash and lost 13 lbs. I want to avoid any and all complications. I guess I have to be intubated right? Sorry you’ve had so many surgeries, I have not , but been chronically ill from Valley Fever, pleurisy and TB. All acquired when I lived in Merced Ca many years ago. I have calcification on one lung and granuloma on another. I wish I was better informed on my risk factors, but can’t seem to locate an expert in Rochester NY.

Hearing that this was easy with great recovery is great to hear,

Wow. Im familiar with Merced and know that area. Does sound like alot going on. I wonder if you had an allergic reaction to some of the anesthesia?
Im not sure why you would have all those issues from being intubated. Was it for a short surgery? There is always risks but this seems unusual.

I think a pre-anesthesia consultation with an anesthesiologist might help evaluate what went wrong before, address your current risk factors and ease your mind. If you can get those hospital records that showed what drugs were administered, it would be helpful. You can get past this. Get some good docs on board who understand your risks and get them appropriately dealt with so you can feel comfortable doing another surgery.

Im not sure what kind of insurance you have, but having a thourough evaluation with an internal medicine doctor to discuss the Valley fever, TB and pleurisy, or an infectious disease doc (or both) along with an anesthesiologist. It might take a group effort. I wish I could be more help as I don’t know east coast.

Great advice. I had cosmetic surgery on my neck 6 years ago with a Doctor in Rochester who I knew well and was my client. I so regret that surgery and think the trauma to my throat caused styloids to grow. He had to intubate me for neck procedure due to lots of bleeding. I’m going to meet with him to discuss what went wrong 6 years ago and have a pre-consult with anesthesiologist to get comfortable. That is great advice. I’m 72 and have six grandchildren and married to second husband for 30 years. Prior to the ES diagnosis that suddenly appeared in April, we were very active, went to our local YMCA here 5 times a week U til pandemic hit here. I so want my old life back. We had lots of travel plans and were going to fly to Seattle, and drive down thru California until the virus. I never questioned my cosmetic surgeon about what went wrong because I lost my voice and had the swollen tongue. Once I got better, I didn’t look back. You’ve given me such great feedback. You are an angel.

1 Like

I had no issues with intubation following both my ES surgeries, & a gynae procedure. I hope that Snapple’s info is reassuring!

I will have to look Gynae up. She certainly has helped and I will have a visit with Anesthesiologist. I had bad intubation, so I’m fearful. Everyone is so well versed on this stuff. So impressed.

Good luck getting the plastic surgeon to admit anything. Sounds like an unexpected intubation may have been faulty and I suspect they may blow off your questioning. You may want to get a copy of the operative report and records for that procedure so you are well armed when you go into question him and get the anesthesia records for pre-evaluation. for If your driving from Seattle, you should be fine. Just a pit stop along the way in Los Gatos. I thought about getting a beach rental for a month in Santa Cruz and make a vacation out of it! I did just speak to my friend in public health down there and there has been some spikes in San Jose area. I don’t know how soon you would consider going there, but Im waiting until probably November myself. At my friends advice, the new seasonal flu vaccine is just out and I’m getting it.

Hi eastmas1,

I think gynae refers to a gynecological procedure. Jules is from Great Britain & they use some different terminology than we do in the US.

As far as ES surgery goes, I can second everything Jules & Snapple2020 said. Snapple & I had the same surgeon. I had a sore throat for a few days post op from the intubation (used for breathing during surgery) but that was it. I had no throat pain after my second surgery. My first surgery was 1/2-3/4 hr longer than my second so that might explain it. I also got First Bite Syndrome which I still have, to a very minor degree. For most people it goes away completely w/in a few months.

Based on your age, I expect you’re on Medicare. We have noted that Medicare requires ES surgeries to be done in the hospital w/ a one night stay. Unless you have complications, you will be released in the morning on the day after surgery. Your first week post op will be pretty uncomfy. Post op swelling reaches its peak 3-5 days after surgery. As Snapple2020 noted, sleeping w/ your head elevated to 30º+ (wedge pillows help w/ this - Bed, Bath & Beyond sells one for $25), using a U or V shaped pillow for neck stabilization when sleeping, icing your neck 15 min on & at least 45 min off many times over each day AND ESPECIALLY sticking tightly to the pain meds schedule given by your doctor will help keep your pain at a tolerable level. The second week begins to see reduced pain & the beginnings of greater symptoms recovery. It will take a couple of months before you feel more or less back to your “old self”. Even then, take it easy even on your good days as symptoms can flare again if you push too hard too soon.

Oops, got it . After I thought about it. I figured it must be GYN . Thanks

Sharon Eastman from my iPhone

Isaiah_40_31
August 9

Hi eastmas1,

I think gynae refers to a gynecological procedure. Jules is from Great Britain & they use some different terminology than we do in the US.

As far as ES surgery goes, I can second everything Jules & Snapple2020 said. Snapple & I had the same surgeon. I had a sore throat for a few days post op from the intubation (used for breathing during surgery) but that was it. I had no throat pain after my second surgery. My first surgery was 1/2-3/4 hr longer than my second so that might explain it. I also got First Bite Syndrome which I still have, to a very minor degree. For most people it goes away completely w/in a few months.

Based on your age, I expect you’re on Medicare. We have noted that Medicare requires ES surgeries to be done in the hospital w/ a one night stay. Unless you have complications, you will be released in the morning on the day after surgery. Your first week post op will be pretty uncomfy. Post op swelling reaches its peak 3-5 days after surgery. As Snapple2020 noted, sleeping w/ your head elevated to 30º+ (wedge pillows help w/ this - Bed, Bath & Beyond sells one for $25), using a U or V shaped pillow for neck stabilization when sleeping, icing your neck 15 min on & at least 45 min off many times over each day AND ESPECIALLY sticking tightly to the pain meds schedule given by your doctor will help keep your pain at a tolerable level. The second week begins to see reduced pain & the beginnings of greater symptoms recovery. It will take a couple of months before you feel more or less back to your “old self”. Even then, take it easy even on your good days as symptoms can flare again if you push too hard too soon.

Sorry, I forget we call things different things!

That’s ok. No worries. I forgot you are from UK😀

What does first bite syndrome mean? Is this a permanent problem?

First bite is where you get a sharp pain in your jaw/ cheek area when you first eat something. It’s common after this sort of surgery, they think it’s irritated nerves around the parotid gland . Not everyone gets it, & it’s not permanent, but sometimes can drag on a bit.

Wonderful. Definitely not going to be easy. Thanks.

1 Like